The Misfortune Teller
You Can't Do A Wrong Thing The Right Way

 

Poetic License

Freedom means absence of restraint. License means taking advantage of it.


"You would learn very little in this world if you were not allowed to imitate. And to repeat
your imitation until some solid grounding in the skill was achieved and the slight but wonderful
difference — that made you you and no one else — could assert itself."
-- Mary Oliver, A Poetry Handbook

So ...


In the Gaelic Bardic style:

In the style of the Alexander Pushkin's "Eugene Onegin":

In the style of the traditional Mad Song "Tom O'Bedlam":

In the style of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner":

In the style of Robert Browning's "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came":

In the style of Keats' "The Belle Dame Sans Merci":

In the style of Swinburne's "A Forsaken Garden":

Irate explorations in Iambic Pentameter:

In the Japanese Haiku Style:

Couplets:

All-lines-rhymed couplet/quatrain:

Employing the Trochee (accented-unaccented) stress pattern:

In the style of Dylan Thomas' "Do not go gentle into that good night":

In the style of Percey Shelley's "Ozymandias":

In the Double-Dactyl verse format:

Animist Existentialism

After the examples of popular song lyrics:

In the style of George Orwell's "Beasts of England":

Experiments in so-called "Free Verse":

Warfare Welfare and Makework Militarism:

Miscellaneous:

Whimsy:

Manufactured Mendacity and Managed Mystification:

Quatrains:

Terza Rima sonnets in homage to Dante Aligheiri and Percy Shelley:

"The Triumph of Strife":

In the style of Lewis Carroll's "The Walrus and the Carpenter":

"Fernando Po, U.S.A., America's post-literate retreat to Plato's Cave":

Elegy:

Experimental:

Modified Spenserian Sonnet:

Ottava Rima:

Michael Murry, "The Misfortune Teller," Copyright © 2012